Spectroscopy Since 1975
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Articles

Scan of brain with various MS images from different regions
Shannon Cornett

This article describes MALDI imaging’s potential uses in pathology applications, and the benefits of the technique to map hundreds of biomolecules (proteins, lipids and glycans, for example) in a label-free, untargeted manner or for imaging target proteins using a modified immunohistochemistry protocol, often from a single tissue section.

Article  |  Issue 34/4 (2022)

Despite a multitude of chemical and physical methods capable of detecting fingerprint residues, there are substantial challenges with fingerprint recovery. Spectroscopic methods have played a critical role in the analysis of fingerprints, used to identify the chemical constituents present, examine their degradation over time and compare the chemical variation between donors.

Article  |  Issue 34/3 (2022)
Hilde Jans, Xavier Rottenberg

This article is about photoacoustic imaging and spectroscopy, and their use for looking inside us, where they have a number of benefits. Hilde Jans and Xavier Rottenberg explain the fundamentals and how new technology may be bringing a new photoacoustics age.

Article  |  Issue 34/1 (2022)
Sophie Lemmens, Lies De Groef, Wouter Charle, Murali Jayapala, Jan Theunis, Lieve Moons, Patrick De Boever, Ingeborg Stalmans

Eyes may or may not be the window into our souls, but it does seem that they are the window into our brains. This article explains how hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to image the retina to diagnose Alzheimer’s Disease. The results are processed by machine learning and give the best performance when HSI and OCT data are combined.

Article  |  Issue 33/6 (2021)
Gerrit Polder, Aoife Gowen

What should we be calling the various types of spectral imaging? The authors lay out some suggestions and welcome your views.

Article  |  Issue 33/3 (2021)
Lola Pérez-Marín

The SensorFINT COST Action is a European Network for assuring food integrity using non-destructive spectral sensors.

Article  |  Issue 33/3 (2021)
Antony N. Davies

Following our articles on the FAIR initiative, we now look at some examples of the FAIRification of data handling, collection and archiving.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 33/3 (2021)
View of the entrance to analytica virtual
Susanne Grödl

How did a major trade show organiser cope with the disruption of COVID-19? Susanne Grödl, Exhibition Director of analytica for Messe München, gives her experience.

Article  |  Issue 33/1 (2021)
Karsten Hinrichs, Christoph Kratz, Andreas Furchner

This article describes a recently introduced, rapid, laser-based hyperspectral method for thin-film analysis in the mid-IR fingerprint range.

Article  |  Issue 32/2 (2020)
Antony N. Davies, Henk-Jan van Manen

With a significant proportion of our regular readership probably under home lock-down, we were wondering if we could help you at this difficult time by pointing out some useful online resources. So, when we finally come out of this pandemic, you could do so better skilled and more up-to-date than when we went in to it.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 32/2 (2020)
Antony N. Davies, Lutgarde Buydens

Tony and Lutgarde Buydens give us an update on the planning for the major EuroAnalysis 2021 conference, which is being held in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, at the end of August 2021. At this stage, they are keen to gather suggestions from readers on topics they would like to see covered. Groups are also invited to consider hosting their own event under the EuroAnalysis 2021 banner.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 32/1 (2020)
Katie Ember

An interesting insight into, well, a week in the life of the author as a fourth-year PhD student. Katie is working on investigating a way of detecting liver damage using spectroscopy, which is “about as interdisciplinary as you can get”! I’m sure all readers will find it interesting and it may be helpful for those you know who may be considering a PhD.

Article  |  Issue 31/2 (2019)
Photo of waste material
Giuseppe Bonifazi, Giuseppe Capobianco, Roberta Palmieri, Silvia Serranti

The authors look at two important areas of recycling of waste materials: concrete and plastics. If aggregates are to be recycled from concrete, the presence of pollutants (plastics, foams, brick etc.) and the degree of removal of cement mortar from the aggregates must be assessed and monitored. NIR hyperspectral imaging with PLS does a good job of both tasks.

Article  |  Issue 31/2 (2019)
Depiction of underwater robot scanning a reef.
Jonathan Teague, Jack Willans, Michael J. Allen, Thomas B. Scott, John C.C. Day

Coral reefs have been used as examples of climate change in action for decades, since the “bleaching” caused by corals stressed by heat expelling their symbiotic photosynthesising algae is such a dramatic effect. Jonathan Teague, Jack Willans, Michael Allen, Thomas Scott and John Day describe their work in developing a hyperspectral imaging system that can be deployed on a submersible remotely operated vehicle to monitor coral health through changes in their natural fluorescence

Article  |  Issue 31/1 (2019)
Antony N. Davies

Tony Davies continues his quest to find out what you all need to work more efficiently. You will remember that in the last issue, Tony introduced his survey to discover what developments were needed in spectroscopy by readers. Some of the initial responses are explored, and Tony finds that he has opened a “can of worms”.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 29/6 (2017)
Enrico Pigorsch, Matthias Finger, Johanna Kerber, Michael Fleck

We all know how spectroscopy and other analytical technologies have played important roles in detecting fraud and in authentication. Paper collages, or photomontages, are part of the art market that is seeing much interest amongst collectors. It is difficult to detect forgeries just through expertise. The use of NIR imaging offers a number of ways to identify forgeries or authenticate the collage non-destructively; from determining the glue used to the revealing of printing on the back of the pieces or paper, which often have been taken from books and magazines.

Article  |  Issue 29/1 (2017)
Catherine E. Nicholson, Andrew Beeby, Richard Gameson

It is not every issue that one of our articles starts with a quotation in medieval English, and it is appropriate as two of our articles cover the use of spectroscopy in cultural heritage. This is yet another field where the rich information provided by spectroscopy, along with its non-destructive nature (for many techniques), portability and ability to generate chemical images make it the answer to many questions. Kate Nicholson, Andrew Beeby and Richard Gameson are responsible for the medieval English at the start of their article “Shedding light on medieval manuscripts”. They describe the general use of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of historical artefacts, and, in particular, their work on medieval European manuscripts and 18th century watercolour pigments. They stess the importance of checking the actual laser power density to avoid damage to priceless artefacts.

Article  |  Issue 28/4 (2016)
J. Bianca Jackson

Terahertz spectroscopy and imaging of Paleolithic cave etchings, 14th century paintings in a church and a mid-20th century Italian painting are all described. This helps demonstrate the versatility of the technique as well as its potential in cultural heritage preservation.

Article  |  Issue 28/4 (2016)
José A. Heredia-Guerrero, José J. Benítez, Eva Domínguez, Ilker S. Bayer, Roberto Cingolani, Athanassia Athanassiou, Antonio Heredia

Much of the exterior surface of plants is covered by the cuticle. This plays a vital role in protecting the plant from water loss, attack by pests and pathogens and damage from UV radiation. Infrared spectroscopy is very useful in characterising cuticles, as we learn in “Infrared spectroscopy as a tool to study plant cuticles” by José Heredia-Guerrero, José Benítez, Eva Domínguez, Ilker Bayer, Roberto Cingolani, Athanassia Athanassioua and Antonio Heredia. The authors point out that, whilst still in its early stages, infrared spectroscopy has provided valuable information about the functional groups, chemical structure and arrangement and interactions of plant cuticle components.

Article  |  Issue 28/2 (2016)
Photo of dragonfly wing
Mark J. Tobin, Ljiljana Puskar, Song Ha Nguyen, Jafar Hasan, Hayden K. Webb, Carol J. Hirschmugl, Michael J. Nasse, Gediminas Gervinskas, Saulius Juodkazis, Gregory S. Watson, Jolanta A. Watson, David E. Mainwaring, Peter J. Mahon, Richard Marchant, Russell J. Crawford, Elena P. Ivanova

Mark Tobin and colleagues describe “Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and imaging of dragonfly, damselfly and cicada wing membranes”. Insects and plants have evolved highly specialised surfaces such as being highly water repellent or superhydrophobic, which also confers self cleaning properties. This is of interest to materials scientists to help in the development of manufactured materials with similar properties. High spatial resolution FT-IR spectroscopy and imaging provide useful information about the complex chemical patterning that contributes to this functionality.

Article  |  Issue 27/4 (2015)