Spectroscopy Since 1975
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Articles

Diagram of scattering
Wieland Hill, Antony N. Davies

This article describes a really interesting use of spectroscopic data processing from optical fibre cables.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 33/6 (2022)
Four Generations of Quality timeline
John P. Hammond

John Hammond finishes his magnum opus on “Four Generations of Quality” with a look at what is science fiction and what is science fact. He considers what may turn out to be “fact” in the future for each of the preceding eight articles in the series.

QM Column  |  Issue 34/6 (2022)
Raman spectrum of aspirin
Jasim M.S. Jamur

A Raman spectroscopy method was optimised to examine the chemical changes of aspirin tablets after interaction with helium temperatures.

Article  |  Issue 34/5 (2022)
Logo from the ALI2004 conference
Antony N. Davies

Tony Davies has started a timeline of significant spectroscopic system developments aligned with Queen Elizabeth’s reign as recently celebrated in her Platinum Jubilee. Jumping from Princess Anne the Princess Royal’s birth to Heinrich Kaiser certainly makes for a novel approach! Tony hopes that we can turn this into an online resource with your help.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 34/5 (2022)
Photo of quantum dots in tubes
John P. Hammond

This article looks at three related spectroscopic techniques/tools in the toolbox, namely, Fluorescence, near infrared (NIR) and Raman; and discuss the “what”, “where” and “how” of these techniques are being used to improve the quality of the measurement processes associated with them.

QM Column  |  Issue 34/4 (2022)
​​​​​​​Holger Gibhardt, Fabian Ziegler, Götz Eckold

Holger Gibhardt, Fabian Ziegler and Götz Eckold tell us about the use of Raman spectroscopy to understand complex electric and magnetic interactions in multiferroic ionic crystals. Multiferroics are a relatively new class of materials that exhibit magnetic and electrical ordering simultaneously. Both phenomena are coupled so that electric forces may be used to control the magnetic structure and vice versa. Raman enables understanding of the underlying processes on the atomic level, essential for the development of new materials with these properties.

Article  |  Issue 33/5 (2021)
Mohamed Mokhtar, Tamer Wafy, Mahmoud Abdelhafiz

Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for selected energetic material detection is the topic of Mohamed Mokhtar, Tamer Wafy and Mahmoud Abdelhafiz. They have investigated various approaches to improve the SERS response of explosive materials and have come up with a simpler, one-step method for the detection of natural, solid TNT.

Article  |  Issue 33/5 (2021)
Lola Pérez-Marín

The SensorFINT COST Action is a European Network for assuring food integrity using non-destructive spectral sensors.

Article  |  Issue 33/3 (2021)
Antony N. Davies

Following our articles on the FAIR initiative, we now look at some examples of the FAIRification of data handling, collection and archiving.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 33/3 (2021)
Robert M. Hanson, Damien Jeannerat, Mark Archibald, Ian Bruno, Stuart Chalk, Antony N. Davies, Robert J. Lancashire, Jeffrey Lang, Henry S. Rzepa

The Tony Davies Column offers a challenge to us all with another contribution on FAIR data, which should be Findable, Available, Interoperable and Readable. It is clearly the way we should all be going, everybody from manufacturers and software developers, through researchers to publishers needs to work together.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 33/2 (2021)
View of the entrance to analytica virtual
Susanne Grödl

How did a major trade show organiser cope with the disruption of COVID-19? Susanne Grödl, Exhibition Director of analytica for Messe München, gives her experience.

Article  |  Issue 33/1 (2021)
Jean-Yves Colle, Dario Manara, Thorsten Geisler, Rudy J.M. Konings

A look at recent advances in the use of Raman spectroscopy in the nuclear industry.

Article  |  Issue 32/6 (2020)
Antony N. Davies, Peter McIntyre

Peter McIntyre and Tony Davies remember Bill George, a real Welsh character and educator whose style and charisma influenced many to go on and not only stay in science but to rise to leading positions either in industry or academia.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 32/6 (2020)
Antony N. Davies, Henk-Jan van Manen

In quantitative analysis, is it better to weigh materials when making up standard solutions or to use volumetric techniques? Traditionally, the answer has been “volume”, however, things may not be as straightforward as they seem. Henk-Jan and colleagues have conducted a new experiment, using robots for both sample preparation and spectroscopic analysis which may provide a definitive answer. Unfortunately, the answer must wait for publication of their paper, but Tony and Henk-Jan’s history of this question makes interesting reading nevertheless.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 32/5 (2020)
Antony N. Davies, Henk-Jan van Manen

With a significant proportion of our regular readership probably under home lock-down, we were wondering if we could help you at this difficult time by pointing out some useful online resources. So, when we finally come out of this pandemic, you could do so better skilled and more up-to-date than when we went in to it.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 32/2 (2020)
Antony N. Davies, Lutgarde Buydens

Tony and Lutgarde Buydens give us an update on the planning for the major EuroAnalysis 2021 conference, which is being held in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, at the end of August 2021. At this stage, they are keen to gather suggestions from readers on topics they would like to see covered. Groups are also invited to consider hosting their own event under the EuroAnalysis 2021 banner.

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 32/1 (2020)
G. Festa, C. Andreani, M. Baldoni, V. Cipollari, C. Martínez-Labarga, F. Martini, O. Rickards, M.F. Rolfo, L. Sarti, N. Volante, R. Senesi, F.R. Stasolla, S.F. Parker, A.R. Vassalo, A.P. Mamede, L.A.E. Batista de Carvalho, M.P.M. Marques

Burned bones are often found in archaeological sites as a result of fire or funerary practices and are often the only preserved human remains. Using inelastic neutron scattering, infrared and micro-Raman spectroscopies, the authors can reach definitive conclusions as to the temperature at which the bone was burned. This enables archaeologists and anthropologists to learn more about how ancient civilisations used fire for funerary, burial or cooking purposes.

Article  |  Issue 31/4 (2019)
Katie Ember

An interesting insight into, well, a week in the life of the author as a fourth-year PhD student. Katie is working on investigating a way of detecting liver damage using spectroscopy, which is “about as interdisciplinary as you can get”! I’m sure all readers will find it interesting and it may be helpful for those you know who may be considering a PhD.

Article  |  Issue 31/2 (2019)
Photo of caries in human teeth.
Mariana Monteiro, Filipa Chasqueira, Sofia Pessanha

In this work we demonstrate the suitability of confocal Raman microscopy for the characterisation of carious dental tissues. Samples of enamel and dentine, presenting carious lesions in different stages of progression, were evaluated by comparing the depolarisation ratio of the PO43– symmetric stretching band at 959 cm–1 in the different tissues. Both line and area scans were performed to gauge these variations. Moreover, the obtained results were compared with the tissues’ behaviour when interacting with ultraviolet radiation, namely the induced fluorescence in some tissues. The depolarisation ratio has proven to be a valuable tool in recognition of demineralisation of both enamel and dentine due to caries. The analyses of the collagen bands in the dentine sample turned out to be more difficult to evaluate due to high fluorescence in the carious region.

Article  |  Issue 30/3 (2018)
David Perez-Guaita, Kamila Kochan, Anja Rüther, Phillip Heraud, Guillermo Quintas, Bayden Wood

Different spectroscopic techniques have been combined to provide additional and complementary information for decades. Increasingly, this is being expanded beyond just two techniques and may include spatial/imaging information as well. All of which bring their own challenges. In “Multimodal imaging of cells and tissues: all photons are welcome”, David Perez-Guaita, Kamila Kochana Anja Rüther, Phillip Heraud, Guillermo Quintas and Bayden Wood report an example of these new approaches. They look at the use of infrared, Raman and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies to obtain combined imaging data of whole algal cells and discuss how to overcome the challenges.

Article  |  Issue 29/5 (2017)