Spectroscopy Since 1975

Articles

If laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was a brand: some market considerations

Vincenzo Palleschi
Vince Palleschi takes a slightly different approach to reviewing the current state of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). He puts the strengths and weaknesses of LIBS in context and gives some examples of industrial applications.
 
Article  |  Issue 29/2 (2017)

Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for surface hardness measurements

Richard D. Pilkington, J. Stuart Astin, John S. Cowpe

Another surface problem is tackled by Richard Pilkington, Stuart Astin and John Cowpe: “Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for surface hardness measurements”. Measuring the hardness of materials is not entirely straightforward, and the authors show that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy offers the potential for in situ hardness measurements, without prior sample preparation.

Article  |  Issue 27/6 (2015)

Two dimensional elemental mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

Jan Novotný, Karel Novotný, David Prochazka, Aleš Hrdlička, Jozef Kaiser

The authors tell us about “Two dimensional elemental mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy”. LIBS seems to be finding increasing applications and to be receiving interest by the instrument manufacturers at present. The article provides an introduction to the technique and goes on to show how it can be used for elemental mapping in materials analysis.

Article  |  Issue 26/6 (2014)

Determining spatial sodium distribution in fresh and aged bread using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

Maarten Scholtes-Timmerman, Cees Heddes, Martijn Noort, Sjaak van Veen

Bread is the major contributor to Na intake in the human diet. For this reason, it is expected that lowering the amount of salt in bread may lead to a substantial reduction in the sodium intake. However, lowering the amount of salt in bread has an impact on the flavour. Using LIBS, a fast and easy-to-use method could be set up to determine Na distribution in baked bread as an innovative tool to help the development of methods to reduce total sodium content in bread.

Article  |  Issue 25/3 (2013)

Simultaneous Raman-LIBS for the standoff analysis of explosive materials

Javier Moros, Juan Antonio Lorenzo, Patricia Lucena, Luciano Miguel Tobaria, José Javier Laserna

The problem of detecting, recognising and identifying explosives at significant standoff distances has proved one of the most difficult—and most important—challenges during recent years, being today, one of the most demanding applications of spectroscopic techniques. The limited number of sophisticated available techniques potentially capable of standoff detection of minimal amounts of explosives is based on laser spectroscopy. Of the recently developed techniques, Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are considered significant for their potential for homeland defence applications.

Article  |  Issue 22/3 (2010)

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and its application to the remote characterisation of hazardous materials

Andrew I. Whitehouse

An introduction to Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and examples of its use for remote applications.

Article  |  Issue 18/2 (2006)