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Articles

Measuring brain activity using functional near infrared spectroscopy: a short review

Felix Scholkmann, Martin Wolf

“Measuring brain activity using functional near infrared spectroscopy: a short review” by Felix Scholkmann and Martin Wolf looks at the various methods for performing fNIRS and some applications that demonstrate why this non-invasive, safely applicable, portable and cost-effective method is now an integral part of the techniques used in neuroscience.

Article  |  Issue 24/4 (2012)

Reverse engineering of polymeric multilayers using AFM-based nanoscale IR spectroscopy and thermal analysis

Tom Eby, Usha Gundusharma, Michael Lo, Khoren Sahagian, Curtis Marcott, Kevin Kjoller

It is possible to obtain both infrared spectra and thermal analysis data of individual layers in a cross-sectioned multilayer film. Since both techniques are AFM-based, the topographical features can be readily linked to the spectroscopic and thermal data at a much higher spatial resolution than previously achievable.

Article  |  Issue 24/3 (2012)

Fireworks: composition and chemistry through Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDS imaging

Kepa Castro, Silvia Fdez-Ortiz de Vallejuelo, Juan Manuel Madariaga

Whilst fireworks are a great entertainment, they can also be used for illegal activities as well as potentially containing dangerous chemicals. The combination of Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDS turns out to be a very efficient analytical method. In fact, these complementary techniques may also be used to analyse other kinds of pyrotechnic artefacts, low explosive formulations, high explosives, explosion residues etc.

Article  |  Issue 24/3 (2012)

The role of microspectroscopy techniques in the study of historic artworks

Nati Salvadó, Salvador Butí, Trinitat Pradell

Nati Salvadó, Salvador Butí and Trinitat Pradell have used a number of techniques to investigate changes in pictorial techniques in Catalan paintings in the 15th century. The combination of different techniques is of particular value. The use of synchtrotron radiation as a light source is also an advantage.

Article  |  Issue 22/6 (2010)

Revealing the presence of creatine in human spinal cord in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, by infrared microspectroscopy

Magdalena Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Joanna Chwiej, Paul Dumas, Barbara Tomikc Dariusz Adamek, Marek Lankosz

We have previously investigated the topographic and quantitative changes in the distribution of trace metals in spinal cords from ALS and control patients. X-ray fluorescence microscopy was used to investigate their metallic nature and distribution in single nerve cells. A deeper understanding of the neurodegenerative processes in ALS requires focus on the biochemical changes occurring in nervous tissue of such a disorder. For this purpose, we have undertaken an infrared microspectroscopy study. While metals are suggested to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ALS, they typically do not occur in tissues as free ions. This results in the presence of the complex mechanisms of metal ions buffering that protect cells against their toxic effects. Metal homeostasis is regulated by several proteins. Such proteins containing metal cofactor are called metalloproteins.

Article  |  Issue 22/4 (2010)

Laser ablation ICP atomic emission spectrometry: a new tool for imaging of pharmaceutical tablets

M. Mohamed, A.G. Cox, C.W. McLeod

Imaging of organic and inorganic constituents of tablets represents a considerable challenge and no single spectroscopic approach can provide definitive characterisation of all components and/or satisfy key measurement criteria such as sensitivity, specificity, resolution and speed of analysis. Laser ablation in combination with ICP emission spectrometry represents a powerful new tool for imaging elemental distribution in pharmaceutical tablets.

Article  |  Issue 22/4 (2010)

The sound of science

A.M.C. Davies

I recently “discovered” a very interesting radio programme on BBC Radio 4. It is “devoted to the powerful, sometimes beautiful, often abused but ever ubiquitous world of numbers”. A few weeks ago we were asked to say what we were doing while listening to the programme. The next week we were told that nearly 2000 e-mails had been received and this data had been given to information designer David McCandless to turn into a graphic. When this was trailed I got the impression that something new and exciting was going to be displayed and I thought that the graphic would include sound. The graphic is good but rather “ordinary” and I was disappointed. This got me thinking about how we display information. Have we made any advance in the last 25 years? Could sound be used!

Tony Davies Column  |  Issue 22/4 (2010)

The role of MALDI-enabled linear ion trap mass spectrometry as a sensitive tool in tissue imaging

Maria C. Prieto Conaway, Shousong Cao, Farukh Durrani, Youcef Rustum, Ping Wang, Khin Marlarc, Latif Kazim

This article discusses matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) enabled linear ion trap (LIT) mass spectrometry (MS) as a technique for fast and accurate tissue imaging, compared to the more traditional time-of-flight (ToF) method.

Article  |  Issue 20/6 (2008)

XPS surface analysis: imaging and spectroscopy of metal and polymer surfaces

Antonella Rossi,, Bernhard Elsener, Nicholas D. Spencer

Antonella Rossi,a,b Bernhard Elsenera and Nicholas D. SpencerbaDepartment of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Cagliari, Campus of Monserrato, 09100 Cagliari, Italy

Article  |  Issue 16/6 (2004)

Polymer characterisation by spectroscopic imaging: infrared and electron microscopy: a good match

Peter Wilhelm,a Boril Chernev,a Peter Pölt,a Gerald Kothleitner,a Klaus-Jochen Eichhorn,b Gisela Pompe,b Nikola Johnerc and Alexander Piryc

aResearch Institute for Electron Microscopy, Graz University of Technology; Steyrergasse 17, A-8010 Graz, Austria. E-mail: [email protected]
bInstitute of Polymer Research Dresden; Hohe Straße 6, D-01069 Dresden, Germany

Article  |  Issue / ()

Near infrared spectroscopy: the practical chemical imaging solution

Frederick W. Koehler IV, Eunah Lee, E. Neil Lewis

Chemical imaging spectroscopy is an exciting new analytical advance that answers commonly asked questions such as what chemical species are in a sample, how much of each is present, and most importantly, where are they located? Through the fusion of traditional infrared spectroscopy with powerful microscopic and macroscopic imaging capabilities, chemical imaging spectroscopy answers all these questions simultaneously, in a single rapid measurement.

Article  |  Issue 14/3 (2002)

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