Problem of fake medicines in developing countries could be solved by NMR

Counterfeiting of drugs is a huge industry with an annual turnover of more than €50 billion. In Africa the situation is extremely serious: half of the malaria medication sold there could be ineffective or even harmful. Researchers from Lund University, Sweden, and King’s College London, UK, have now developed a technique based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that could provide a good way to identify counterfeit drugs.

Read more: Problem of fake medicines in developing countries could be solved by NMR

 

IR spectroscopy finds E. coli in beef faster

Infrared spectroscopy can detect E. coli faster than current testing methods and can cut days off investigations of outbreaks, according to a study at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.

Read more: IR spectroscopy finds E. coli in beef faster

 

Research Heralds Potential for Early Diagnosis of Degenerative Brain Disorders

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy can distinguish between neurological diseases in patients without clear symptoms.

Read more: Research Heralds Potential for Early Diagnosis of Degenerative Brain Disorders

   

Mapping the Structure of Protonated Water Clusters

Water molecules are continuously forming short-lived networks called clusters. These can in turn bind positively charged protons, and such clusters can provide active functional groups in proteins. Using infrared spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the bond strengths, geometrical structures and chemical properties of protonated water clusters. In order to measure the spectrum of molecular vibrations in clusters it is, however, necessary to use other molecules as messengers. A team of physicists and chemists including Dr Gerald Mathias of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich and Professor Dominik Marx of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum has, for the first time, described how these messengers influence the assignment of spectral bands by infrared spectroscopy.

Read more: Mapping the Structure of Protonated Water Clusters

 

Initial Trials on New Ovarian Cancer Tests with Mass Spec Exhibit Extremely High Accuracy

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology, GA, USA, have attained very promising results on their initial investigations of a new test for ovarian cancer. Using a new technique involving mass spectrometry of a single drop of blood serum, the test correctly identified women with ovarian cancer in 100% of the patients tested.

Read more: Initial Trials on New Ovarian Cancer Tests with Mass Spec Exhibit Extremely High Accuracy

   

Bruker to Acquire Veeco's Scanning Probe Microscopy and Optical Industrial Metrology Scientific Instruments Business

Bruker Corporation has signed an agreement to acquire the Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) and Optical Industrial Metrology (OIM) instruments business from Veeco Instruments, Inc. for $229 million in cash. The transaction has been approved by the Boards of Directors of both companies and is expected to close during the fourth quarter of 2010, pending regulatory review and subject to customary closing conditions.

Read more: Bruker to Acquire Veeco's Scanning Probe Microscopy and Optical Industrial Metrology Scientific Instruments Business

 

Tracking valence electrons in real time with pump–probe spectroscopy

Laser pulses lasting less than 150 attoseconds have been used to observe, in real time, the motion of electrons in the outermost (“valence”) shell of ionised krypton atoms. This technical achievement, reported in Nature 466(7307), 739–742, lays the groundwork for observations in more complex systems, which should allow a detailed examination of the fundamental processes underlying the making and breaking of chemical bonds.

Read more: Tracking valence electrons in real time with pump–probe spectroscopy

   

AFM and spectroscopic techniques determine unknown structure

Microscopy with atomic resolution could be useful in the determining the structure of some unknown organic compounds, such as medicinally important natural products, according to a study online in Nature Chemistry. This method could avoid the lengthy and expensive process of trying to synthesise the compound and then compare its structure with that of the natural one, which is necessary in some cases.

Read more: AFM and spectroscopic techniques determine unknown structure

 

Tracking a chemical reaction using molecular interference

A new technique for following chemical reactions in real time makes a virtue of necessity, by using the radiation from non-reacting molecules as part of the detection method. As reported in Nature, this implementation of “high-harmonic interferometry” can be used to monitor both molecular structure and electron dynamics, the latter with attosecond time resolution.

Read more: Tracking a chemical reaction using molecular interference

   

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