Tracking valence electrons in real time with pump–probe spectroscopy

Laser pulses lasting less than 150 attoseconds have been used to observe, in real time, the motion of electrons in the outermost (“valence”) shell of ionised krypton atoms. This technical achievement, reported in Nature 466(7307), 739–742, lays the groundwork for observations in more complex systems, which should allow a detailed examination of the fundamental processes underlying the making and breaking of chemical bonds.

Read more: Tracking valence electrons in real time with pump–probe spectroscopy

 

AFM and spectroscopic techniques determine unknown structure

Microscopy with atomic resolution could be useful in the determining the structure of some unknown organic compounds, such as medicinally important natural products, according to a study online in Nature Chemistry. This method could avoid the lengthy and expensive process of trying to synthesise the compound and then compare its structure with that of the natural one, which is necessary in some cases.

Read more: AFM and spectroscopic techniques determine unknown structure

 

Tracking a chemical reaction using molecular interference

A new technique for following chemical reactions in real time makes a virtue of necessity, by using the radiation from non-reacting molecules as part of the detection method. As reported in Nature, this implementation of “high-harmonic interferometry” can be used to monitor both molecular structure and electron dynamics, the latter with attosecond time resolution.

Read more: Tracking a chemical reaction using molecular interference

   

Association of British Spectroscopists (ABS) Trust Fund Bursaries 2010

The ABS Trust invites UK-based university students undertaking spectroscopy research or utilising spectroscopy as a major component of their research to apply for a bursary award to attend a recognised scientific meeting to present an oral or poster presentation or to visit a place of learning to advance their spectroscopy knowledge and understanding.

More details and an application form may be requested from John Chalmers at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

XRF unveils Leonardo Da Vinci’s faces

Louvre1-sHow did Leonardo Da Vinci manage to paint such perfect faces? XRF analysis has shown the composition and thickness of each layer of material laid down by the painter. The results reveal that, in the case of glazes, thin layers of 1–2 µm have been applied.

Read more: XRF unveils Leonardo Da Vinci’s faces

   

NMR at new research centre makes important discovery in protein regulation

The new Jean Jeener Bio-NMR Centre at the VIB Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, has already played a role in a scientific breakthrough that has been published Cell. Thanks to NMR, it is possible to determine the dynamic structure of proteins, and it was used to find out how the activity of certain proteins involved in the stress physiology of bacteria is regulated.

Read more: NMR at new research centre makes important discovery in protein regulation

 

Award for young NIR scientists

Since 2004 the Büchi Young Scientists NIRAward has been given to young scientists who worked during their diploma or doctoral thesis in the field of near infrared spectroscopy and achieved outstanding results. In the past many excellent scientists from NIR research groups all over the world have received this award.

Read more: Award for young NIR scientists

   

Lens for XPS to receive award

APPELS, differentially pumped Ambient Pressure PhotoElectron Lens System for photoemission studies, is one of four inventions from the US Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory which have been recognised with the R&D 100 award for 2010 from R&D Magazine, which recognises the 100 most significant proven technological advances of the year.

Read more: Lens for XPS to receive award

 

Bioinformatics approaches for the analysis of lipidomics data

The potential impact of lipid research has been increasingly realised both in disease treatment and prevention. Recent advances in soft ionisation mass spectrometry (MS) such as electrospray ionisation (ESI) have permitted parallel monitoring of several hundreds of lipids in a single experiment and thus facilitated lipidomics level studies. These advances, however, pose a greater challenge for bioinformaticians to handle massive amounts of information-rich MS data from modern analytical instruments in order to understand complex functions of lipids.

Read more: Bioinformatics approaches for the analysis of lipidomics data

   

Page 16 of 23

subscribe-free

Free Spectroscopy Europe Apps

SE-apps
Read Spectroscopy Europe on our new free Apps for Apple and Android.
See the complete range of Spectroscopy Europe Editions and choose which suit you.

Free print subscription

Cover-25-4
Register for a Free print magazine if you are in Europe, the Middle East or Asia–Pacific.

Digital Editions

SE-SA-DEs
Read the free Digital Editions of Spectroscopy Europe and Spectroscopy Asia.

Contents Alerts

Receive updates whenever a new issue of Spectroscopy Europe is published. Just enter your e-mail address:

Latest Comments

  • fred isaboke said More...
    Want to inquire about the specificati... 1 month ago
  • Markus Rupprecht said More...
    Dear Tony Davies,
    thank you so much f... 4 months ago
  • corriou said More...
    I have read with interest the text, b... 7 months ago
  • Kim H. Esbensen said More...
    re. WDXRF possibilities to map hetero... 1 year ago
  • admin said More...
    Sorry about that and thank you for le... 1 year ago

Upcoming Events

RSS Feeds

Ninja RSS Syndicator is not Installed!

Follow Spectroscopy on Twitter