Webinar: Techniques and Tools for Trace Metals and Nutritional Food Analysis

module_perkin_main

With global concerns about food quality and food safety continuing to garner attention, it is important for both manufacturers and regulatory bodies to have robust analytical instrumentation and methods to ensure accurate and precise results. For the measurement of inorganic elements and nutrients, sample preparation can be of critical importance to the quality of the analysis. This webinar will discuss the process of sample preparation and analysis, the tools and techniques for the measurement of inorganic elements in food, and inorganic speciation of metals.

Find out more and register free >>>

Dates and fates of pyrogenic carbon: using spectroscopy to understand a “missing” global carbon sink

28_2-Carbon-Fig3small

Research into climate change takes many directions, but storing carbon or understanding its release from stores is extremely important. Philippa Ascough, Michael Bird, Will Meredith and Colin Snape tell us about “Dates and fates of pyrogenic carbon: using spectroscopy to understand a “missing” global carbon sink”. Pyrogenic carbon comes from the incomplete burning of biomass, and can be natural, e.g. wild fires, or man-made, e.g. the production of charcoal. The authors describe the uses of a range of spectroscopy techniques to understand the molecular structure of pyrogenic carbon and its role in the global carbon cycle..

Read more: Dates and fates of pyrogenic carbon: using spectroscopy to understand a “missing” global carbon sink

 

Infrared spectroscopy as a tool to study plant cuticles

28_2-Cuticles-Figure-3small

Much of the exterior surface of plants is covered by the cuticle. This plays a vital role in protecting the plant from water loss, attack by pests and pathogens and damage from UV radiation. Infrared spectroscopy is very useful in characterising cuticles, as we learn in “Infrared spectroscopy as a tool to study plant cuticles” by José Heredia-Guerrero, José Benítez, Eva Domínguez, Ilker Bayer, Roberto Cingolani, Athanassia Athanassioua and Antonio Heredia. The authors point out that, whilst still in its early stages, infrared spectroscopy has provided valuable information about the functional groups, chemical structure and arrangement and interactions of plant cuticle components.

Read more: Infrared spectroscopy as a tool to study plant cuticles

 

Central spectroscopic data systems: why are chromatographers so much better equipped?

TD-28-2-Figures-1small

In the Tony Davies Column, Tony is getting jealous of chromatographers in “Central spectroscopic data systems: why are chromatographers so much better equipped?”. Replicating the power of chromatography data systems for spectroscopic data is not that easy.

Read more: Central spectroscopic data systems: why are chromatographers so much better equipped?

   

Is your spectrometer in calibration?

QM-28-2-F2small

“Is your spectrometer in calibration?” ask Chris Burgess and John Hammond. The answer may not be as straightforward as you might think. However, Chris and John explain all.

Read more: Is your spectrometer in calibration?

 

Sampling quality criteria (SQC)

28_2-Sampling-Fig1small

Another side of ensuring that our results are valid is correct sampling. In the latest Sampling Column on “Sampling quality criteria (SQC)” Kim Esbensen and Claas Wagner continue our education in the use of the Theory of Sampling. The fundamental step in ensuring representative sampling is sampling quality criteria, and the authors describe why and how.

Read more: Sampling quality criteria (SQC)

   

Pittcon 2016 Report

Pittcon-2016-LogoNew spectroscopy releases at Pittcon 2016, along with links to further information.

Read more: Pittcon 2016 Report

 

The analytical niche for Raman spectroscopy in biological pigment research

Raman-28_1-Fig.1small

As you will have noticed from this issue’s cover, we are making a colourful start to 2016. In the first article on “The analytical niche for Raman spectroscopy in biological pigment research”, Daniel Thomas and Cushla McGoverin suggest that Raman spectroscopy may have a particularly valuable role in pigment biology research. Pigments are almost universal in biology and are the basis of much of what we find attractive in flowers, birds and sea life, such as the fan corals on the cover. The authors show how Raman spectroscopy can be used to quickly confirm the presence of a pigment as well as providing more detailed knowledge about unknown pigments.

Read more: The analytical niche for Raman spectroscopy in biological pigment research

   

Solid mixed matrices and their advantages in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry

MS-28_1-Fig.1small

The bio theme moves to mass spectrometry in “Solid mixed matrices and their advantages in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry” by Marek Šebela. Getting the most from various matrices for use in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) has always been a bit of an art, and the introduction of mixed matrices may increase the number of possible combinations but may improve reproducibility and so simplify analysis in the end. The author describes mixed matrices for a range of samples including proteins, peptides, oligosaccharides, oligonucleotides, lipids, polymers and even intact microbial cells! 

Read more: Solid mixed matrices and their advantages in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry

 

Spectroscopic data handling at petabyte scale

TD-28_1-F2small

In the Tony Davies Column, vast amounts of data and how you handle them are investigated by Tony, and Shane Ellis, Benjamin Balluff and Ron Heeren from the Maastricht MultiModal Molecular Imaging Institute. “Spectroscopic data handling at petabyte scale” shows how one institute is dealing with truly huge amounts of data, both in its collection and in its distribution to scientists for interpretation and analysis. At the same time, the institute has been able to incorporate best practice around the FAIR Data Stewardship of scientific information.In the Tony Davies Column, vast amounts of data and how you handle them are investigated by Tony, and Shane Ellis, Benjamin Balluff and Ron Heeren from the Maastricht MultiModal Molecular Imaging Institute. “Spectroscopic data handling at petabyte scale” shows how one institute is dealing with truly huge amounts of data, both in its collection and in its distribution to scientists for interpretation and analysis. At the same time, the institute has been able to incorporate best practice around the FAIR Data Stewardship of scientific information.

Read more: Spectroscopic data handling at petabyte scale

   

Page 1 of 27

subscribe-free

Free print subscription

Cover-25-4
Register for a Free print magazine if you are in Europe, the Middle East or Asia–Pacific.

Digital Editions

SE-SA-DEs
Read the free Digital Editions of Spectroscopy Europe and Spectroscopy Asia.

Contents Alerts

Receive updates whenever a new issue of Spectroscopy Europe is published. Just enter your e-mail address:

Latest Comments

  • José Alejandro Hered... said More...
    Dear readers,

    I wanted to corroborat... 14 days ago
  • Prof. Dr. Erwin L. Z... said More...
    I, and my research colleagues, are gr... 15 days ago
  • tesfaye said More...
    the NIR spectroscopy reduced the cost... 4 months ago
  • fred isaboke said More...
    Want to inquire about the specificati... 11 months ago
  • Markus Rupprecht said More...
    Dear Tony Davies,
    thank you so much f... 1 year ago

Upcoming Events

RSS Feeds

Ninja RSS Syndicator is not Installed!

Follow Spectroscopy on Twitter