Search
Search Keyword: Total 232 results found.
Tag: Near infrared Ordering

Curtis Marcott, Tadashi Awatani, Jiping Ye, David Gerrard, Michael Lo and Kevin Kjoller give us a “Review of nanoscale infrared spectroscopy applications to energy related materials”. Fuel cells, photovoltaics and specialised polymers for fracking are all considered.

Report on the The Seventh International Conference of Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy (ICAVS-7) held in Kobe, Japan.

Tony (A.M.C.) continues down the last furlong of his series of Tony Davies Column articles. This issue, he considers principal component analysis (PCA). Using research recently published in the Journal of Near Infrared Spectroscopy, he explains that PCA is a very useful tool but it will not solve all our problems. Two old articles on PCA, including Tony’s concept of the “Data Cake” have been added to the website, are referenced in Tony’s article and can be freely downloaded by readers.

With continuing food scares around the world, food producers need every tool they can get to prevent contamination of their products at every stage of production. Hyperspectral reflectance imaging in the NIR combined with chemometrics shows much promise for the detection and identification of foreign bodies among food grains.

Tony (A.M.C.) Davies starts a review of the chemometric ideas that have most excited him over the last 30 years. In this column, he looks at the use of Fourier transformation for data compression. FT can also provide the side benefit of reducing high-frequency noise.

Chemical modification of wood by methods such as acetylation is required to improve characteristics such as photosensitivity and combustibility, and to provide harmonisation of wood properties in order to avoid swelling and shrinking and to improve bio­degradability. The authors describe the use of mid and near infrared spectroscopies to monitor chemical changes due to acetylation is described. Chemical modification of wood by methods such as acetylation is required to improve characteristics such as photosensitivity and combustibility, and to provide harmonisation of wood properties in order to avoid swelling and shrinking and to improve bio­degradability. The authors describe the use of mid and near infrared spectroscopies to monitor chemical changes due to acetylation is described.

This article shows that pyrolysis techniques, in combination with spectroscopy, are helping our understanding of how the organic matter in our solar system came to be. Fascinatingly, they also show how secondary processing of meteorite materials seems to enhance the abilities of atmospheres to host life on planetary surfaces as well as providing the raw materials from which life could originate.

Tony (A.M.C.) Davies and Tom Fearn describe an enhancement of the popular partial least squares (PLS) technique, powered partial least squares (PPLS),  that has shown significantly better results.

Tony Davies makes sure we understand “What IS and what is NOT chemometrics” and why it matters.

“Measuring brain activity using functional near infrared spectroscopy: a short review” by Felix Scholkmann and Martin Wolf looks at the various methods for performing fNIRS and some applications that demonstrate why this non-invasive, safely applicable, portable and cost-effective method is now an integral part of the techniques used in neuroscience.

Medical applications of NIR spectroscopy are covered in this major special issue of JNIRS—Journal of Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

 

The Tony Davies Column once again contains a contribution from Karl Norris, who is widely regarded as the “father of NIR spectroscopy”. Karl continues to produce innovative ideas about the field and this article is no different. Building on the previous article concerning fourth derivatives, Karl has investigated the effect of varying gap sizes with some remarkable results.

Camo Software has announced the launch of a new version of its “all-in-one” multivariate data analysis and design of experiments software, the Unscrambler X. The new version provides improved performance and is optimised for better usability, security and reliability. Version 10.2 continues the company’s tradition of delivering multivariate data analysis software that is easy to use and offers good data visualisation. New features include the addition of Support Vector Machine Regression, Compliance Mode has been added as an installation option for those needing to meet the requirements of electronic signature and record handling, Recalculate with New has been added as a new feature to PCA, PCR and PLS, which allows the addition of new data to an existing model, Data Signature has been added for enhanced data integrity, Blocking of Designs has been added to Full Factorial designs in the Design of Experiments module, three new spectroscopy vendor specific imports have been added—DeltaVu, rap-ID and Visiotec—and an Interpolation function has also been added.

CW laser-driven Xenon light source for high power in the 170–2100 nm range. It works by focusing a 1000 nm laser through a Xenon bulb, creating a high-intensity plasma, which gives maximum output over a broad spectral range. For deep-UV operation there is optional purging.

Online process NIR system comes in multi-parameter and multi-point systems. Remote supervision by internet or intranet is possible and maximum and minimum alarm levels can be set.

Driver for the Thermo Scientific TruProcess NIR analyser. This enables the TruProcess instrument to be interfaced to the Symbion-DX and RX Software Suites as well the Thermo Scientific GRAMS-RT Suite for deployment in on-line chemical and pharmaceutical process analytical technology (PAT) environments. The addition of the Symbion and GRAMS-RT functionalities allows TruProcess analysers to operate as autonomous systems for continuous chemical process analysis, provided with complete sample system control, database storage (including store and forward capability), and integral chemometric modeling and prediction.

An extension of their metal-on-quartz neutral density filters for the NIR produced under ISO/IEC 17025 and ISO Guide 34. This CRM is protected from oxidation, physical degradation and contamination by the use of a novel cover plate optically bonded to the surface providing extended lifetimes. Starna now also offer a range of solid state glass filters between 1% and 92% T in compliance with USP 〈1119〉 NIR protocols.

The NIRQuest spectrometer is an existing product, but they have introduced a new version, the NIRQuest512-1.9, with a wavelength range of 1100–1900 nm. Optical resolution (FWHM) is >10,000

Available in two versions: the standard (950–1650 nm) and extended (1150–2150 nm). It is based on a linear variable filter, which enables it to be made as small as it is. The main market will be for use as an OEM device for construction of handheld NIR spectrometers, but it does work out of the box: just connect it to a laptop or tablet with a USB cable and you can collect spectra.

UV/vis/NIR microscope based on a double-beam scanning spectrophotometer capable of covering 200–2700 nm. There are three different versions: one for the UV/vis, one with a Peltier-cooled detector for the entire 200–2700 nm range and one with an InGaAs detector for measurements between 200 nm and 1700 nm. All models have a user-selectable slit width for variable resolution, as well as selectable circular apertures and an adjustable rectangular aperture for sample area discrimination.