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Tag: Mass spectrometry Ordering

Scientists from the universities of Oxford and Manchester, UK, have used a mass spectrometry molecular fingerprinting technique to identify one Neanderthal bone from around 2000 tiny bone fragments.

University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA, researchers have made a microscopic snapshot of the early renal lipid changes in acute kidney injury, using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) tissue imaging to localise the changes.

Acal BFi have signed a Pan-European distribution agreement with Quantum Light.

The US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Sciex of Framingham, MS, USA, have signed a licensing agreement for technologies that speed up, simplify and expand the use of mass spectrometry instrumentation.

We are all probably aware of the detection of metabolites in wastewater to indicate the levels of illegal drug usage in a locality, but researchers at the University of Valencia have extended this to monitor alcohol consumption in near real time.

A new test for detecting biomarkers for cancer and diabetes based on two-dimensional mass spectrometry is more than 1000× more detailed and 100% faster than existing methods, new research by the University of Warwick, UK, suggests.

Medical testing has been undergoing a quiet but extensive metamorphosis as labs adopt the versatile technology mass spectrometry, which enables more precise diagnosis. A special issue of Clinical Chemistry, titled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”, showcases recent medical advances that this technology has made possible.

A new mass spectrometry test for detecting biomarkers for cancer and diabetes is more than 1000× more detailed and 100% faster than existing methods, new research by the University of Warwick, UK, suggests.

Scientists at the University of Warwick have developed a computation which simultaneously doubles the resolution, sensitivity and mass accuracy of Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (FT-MS) at no extra cost.

Archaeologists examining late period Mayan containers have identified nicotine traces from a codex-style flask, revealing the first physical evidence of tobacco use by ancient Mayans. The study published in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry reveals the flask is marked with Mayan hieroglyphics reading, “y-otoot ’u-may” (“the home of its/his/her tobacco”), making it only the second case to confirm that the text on the exterior of a Mayan vessel corresponds to its ancient use.

Due to the importance of imaging mass spectrometry in the life sciences, the Joint Committee of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) has decided, as part of the “Imaging Mass Spectrometry in the Life Sciences” initiative, to equip nine universities with major instrumentation systems.

Researchers have used mass spectrometry imaging to uncover exactly how a human egg captures an incoming sperm to begin the fertilisation process, in a new study published this week in Science. The research identifies the sugar molecule that makes the outer coat of the egg “sticky”, which is vital for enabling the sperm and egg to bind together. Researchers across the world have been trying to understand what performs this task for over 30 years.

The European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) and the Federation of European Biochemical Societies (FEBS) announce Carol V. Robinson, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford, UK, as the winner of the 2011 FEBS/EMBO Women in Science Award. Professor Robinson has been recognised for her pioneering work in the development of mass spectrometry as a tool used for investigating the structure and dynamics of protein complexes.

Metabolic profiling of tissue samples could transform the way surgeons make decisions in the operating theatre, say researchers at a new laboratory. Scientists at Imperial College London, in partnership with clinicians at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, have installed a high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer in St Mary’s Hospital. Researchers will use the machine to analyse intact tissue samples from patients taking part in studies, to investigate whether it can ultimately give surgeons detailed diagnostic information while their patients are under the knife.

Professor Peter Derrick, has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand. Fellowship is an honour given to top researchers in New Zealand for showing distinction in research or in the advancement of science, technology or the humanities. Peter Derrick moved to New Zealand from the University of Warwick, UK, about four years ago to head the Institute of Fundamental Sciences at Massey University.

Researchers at the University of Konstanz, have for the first time successfully developed a novel on-line bioaffinity-electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) approach, which enables the simultaneous label-free detection, identification and quantification of protein–ligand interactions. Combining the sam5 surface acoustic wave biosensor from SAW Instruments with ESI-MS has enabled the direct connection of protein–ligand dissociation constants (KD) analysis with their subsequent quantification and structural characterisation by MS.

AB SCIEX has expanded its commercial operations in Korea with a new direct sales organisation under AB SCIEX Korea. This expansion was made possible by an agreement with Life Science Korea (LSK) to transfer existing sales, service and marketing personnel to AB SCIEX, effective immediately.

Agilent Technologies Inc. has opened a new life sciences instruments manufacturing facility in Singapore. The facility will produce the company’s LC/MS instruments for the global market.

Bruker Daltonics has been selected by the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) at Florida State University to design and build the world’s first 21.0 T Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) magnet. The magnet will be designed in collaboration with NHMFL scientists and used in the FT-ICR programme at the lab. The contract for the magnet is valued at over $10 million, the project is funded by the National Science Foundation, and delivery of the magnet is planned for the first half of calendar year 2013.

Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is proving to be critical for identifying and differentiating the various components of explosives. ToF-SIMS can potentially be used to differentiate between explosive manufacturers and to reveal an explosive material’s country of origin.