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Application Notes

MetID typically requires analysis of mass spectrometry (MS) data to identify metabolic “hot spots” and elucidate biotransformation pathways. This remains the primary challenge despite significant instrumental and software advances. MetaSense™ overcomes these challenges and allows users to save time and improve collaborations.

This work builds on our previous study of arsenic species in apple juice by incorporating several improvements to the methodology and exploring the analysis more deeply.

IR spectroscopy is a useful tool for group chemical species identification of a wide variety of sample materials, particularly for the classification of “organic” chemical materials based upon carbon atoms being present in the molecular structure.

IR spectroscopy is a useful tool for group chemical species identification of a wide variety of sample materials, particularly for the classification of “organic” chemical materials based upon carbon atoms being present in the molecular structure.

IR spectroscopy is a useful tool for group chemical species identification of a wide variety of sample materials, particularly for the classification of “organic” chemical materials based upon carbon atoms being present in the molecular structure. Many plastic and polymeric type samples which can be included in the category of organic molecular materials can be classified into particular “family” groupings and it is possible to identify the sample family types both qualitatively and quantitatively by use of the Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) technique as an IR measurement. (See - Specac Application Note 42)

IR spectroscopy is a useful tool for group chemical species identification of a wide variety of sample materials, particularly for the classification of “organic” chemical materials based upon carbon atoms being present in the molecular structure. Many plastic and polymeric type samples which can be included in the category of organic molecular materials can be classified into particular “family” groupings and it is possible to identify the sample family types both qualitatively and quantitatively by use of the Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) technique as an IR measurement. (See - Specac Application Note 42).

IR spectroscopy is a useful tool for group chemical species identification of a wide variety of sample materials, particularly for the classification of “organic” chemical materials based upon carbon atoms being present in the molecular structure. Many plastic and polymeric type samples which can be included in the category of organic molecular materials can be classified into particular “family” groupings and it is possible to identify the sample family types both qualitatively and quantitatively by use of the Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) technique as an IR measurement.

In this article, three real-life Raman quantitative and semi-quantitative analysis applications are discussed. These applications showcase the versatility of Raman spectroscopy and the potential impact that it can make in various industries.

The determination of inorganic elements in food substances is critical for assessing nutritional composition and identifying food contamination sources. The measurement of inorganic elements is challenging because there is a wide variety of edible substances. As a result, highly diverse matrices must be analysed accurately. The different matrices can lead to numerous interferences on inorganic elements of interest and the interferences can vary with matrix composition.

There are three main classes of triglycerides—saturated fats, and unsaturated trans-fats and cis-fats. Unsaturation indicates the triglyceride contains one or more carbon–carbon double bonds. Most natural oils like vegetable oil consist of cis-fats and are poly-unsaturated, meaning they contain more than one double bond. The cis nature prevents solidification of the fat; trans-fats solidify more readily, which can lead to blockages in the bloodstream. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy functions well to analyse trans-fats.